Streaming Now…
Bisa Butler / 
The Art Institute of Chicago

NOVEMBER 16, 2020 thru
APRIL 19, 2021

Viewing Hours
Monday—Thursday: 12–1:30pm
Friday: 12–1:30pm,  4:30–8pm
Saturday & Sunday: 1–5pm

In conjunction with American fiber artist Bisa Butler’s solo exhibition “Portraits” at the Art Institute of Chicago, 150 Media Stream is featuring an animated version of Butler’s quilted artwork Southside Sunday Morning. In all her work, Butler creates arresting portraits—composed entirely of vibrantly colored and patterned fabrics—that reimagine and celebrate narratives of Black life. The inspiration for Southside Sunday Morning was a photo taken by Russell Lee for the Farm Securities Administration on Easter morning in the Bronzeville section of Chicago in 1941.

Butler described the conception and process of creating Southside Sunday Morning:

“I was inspired by the smartly dressed, handsome African American boys who had such youthful faces—but such grown up and dapper clothing. The way they are dressed indicates the effort their parents put into making sure that their children looked their best for church on Easter morning. The boys are flawless; from their freshly cut hair and waves all the way to their brand new shoes.”

Negro boys on Easter morning. Southside, Chicago, Illinois, 1941, by Russell Lee

“I chose African Dutch wax fabric to illustrate that although these are American children, their roots are in Africa. The patterns they wear indicate their personal interests; for example, the boy in the middle has bicycles on his pants because I imagined that may be a favored pastime.

Another boy has Legos or building blocks on his jacket to show an interest in constructing things. The background fabric has an undulating chevron pattern that I’ve used to illustrate the frenetic energy of youth. Each child has a distinct and different color complexion because I want to show that while they are all Black, they are all unique. I use color to suggest a mood and a personality. A complexion of oranges and reds hint at a bold personality while blues and violets hint at introversion.

“I’ve called this artwork Southside Sunday Morning as an homage to the movie Uptown Saturday Night by Richard Wesley.”

Southside Sunday Morning, 2018, by Bisa Butler. Cotton, silk, wool and tulle. Quilted and appliquéd. 73” x 109”.

The animated version of Southside Sunday Morning will be on view at 150 Media Stream from November 16, 2020 to April 19, 2021. The animation of the work to be configured for the 150 Media Stream was done by George Berlin Studios.

MORE ABOUT THE ARTIST

Bisa Butler’s portrait quilts vividly capture personal and historical narratives of Black life.

Butler often works with photographs as source images, reimagining portraits with layers of color and stitched details. She strategically selects fabrics, using the history or imagery of the prints to reinforce the stories she wants to communicate in each quilt. Layering materials and meanings, Butler brings to life personal and historical narratives of Black life and invites viewers to look closely and think deeply about the potential and purposes of portraiture.

Butler’s work has been shaped by a variety of influences and experiences, key among them family photo albums, the philosophies of AfriCOBRA (the African Commune of Bad Relevant Artists, established in Chicago in the late 1960s), Romare Bearden’s collages, Faith Ringgold’s mixed-media quilts, and Gordon Parks’s photographs. Butler earned her BFA at Howard University, Washington, DC, and her MA in arts education at Montclair State University, New Jersey. Trained as a painter, she shifted to quiltmaking during her graduate studies, when she made a quilt in honor of her grandmother. She has exhibited in group and solo shows across the United States as well as in China, England, Japan, and South Africa.

In 2019, the Art Institute of Chicago acquired The Safety Patrol and is currently hosting the first solo museum exhibition of Butler’s work Bisa Butler: Portraits which includes over 20 portraits.

Click here to learn more about Butler’s solo exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Also Streaming…
Patrick Steppan
and Odessa Sagli

OCTOBER 19 thru
DECEMBER 31, 2020

Viewing Hours
Monday—Thursday: 
8–9:30am, 4:30–6pm
Friday: 8–9:30am

Shrouded in Smoke is a shifting field of abstract forms. Shadows cast by dancing figures filter through progressively agitated environmental imagery. Prompted by the devastating Australian bushfires, the work ties human action and natural disaster in a cyclical three-act structure. It weaves together images of trees and foliage reflected in water to create an environment that progressively becomes more agitated and deconstructed.

This work was created by Patrick Steppan and Odessa Sagli, recent graduates from Knox College (Galesburg, IL), who won the 150 Media Stream Scholarship for Digital Art, cosponsored by Associated Colleges of Illinois. Their proposal was selected from among twenty-seven invited colleges by Yuge Zhou, curator of 150 Media Stream. Tim Stedman, assistant professor of design at Knox College, supervised the students’ project.

Please read this article published by Knox College on how Patrick and Odessa created the project.

Click here to read an interview with Patrick Steppan and Odessa Sagli.

Streaming Next… Action Lines / The Joffrey Ballet

“Starmesh” by @saraludy on view until September 30th; Public viewing hours Fri 6-8pm, Sat & Sun 1-5pm. Visit #linkinbio to learn more about the work.
Last weekend to see “A forest through time” by Christopher Andrew @stoptime_travels and @tablapusher; public viewing hours 1-5pm Sat & Sun. #150mediastream #streamon
In light of recent events, Art on theMART and 150 Media Stream have decided to postpone the public webinar: "What is Next for Public Art: Time-Based Media Artists in Conversation", which was scheduled for Wednesday, June 3rd (today) at 6pm CT. This was a difficult decision for us, but we felt the need to reflect and broaden the topics. We will reach out to you when we reschedule this webinar. 
Art is part of life. It helps us express our humanity and all its complexities and struggles. At its best, it fosters constructive dialogue. Our program strives to offer a venue for this dialogue, a public site of shared dreams and a forum to embrace our commonality. @artonthemart @150mediastream @yugezhou
During this special time, we will revisit our past projects and featured artists. This week we will take a look at “Dancing Human” by Chicago-based artist @judy.k.suh. Drawing inspiration from Eadweard Muybridge’s photographic studies of motion, the piece breaks down a dancer’s movement into a series of still images created from shooting on Super 8 and 35mm. It was conceived specifically for the unique structure of 150 Media Stream, utilizing the vertical screens to present the film strips in their entirety. Alluding to film editing, the strips were cut and organized for a visual rhythm rather than temporal rhythm, and reveals analog technology in all its imperfections—dusts, scratches and light leaks. #150MediaStream #StreamOn

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